Tag: 上海龙凤同城对对碰

LADIES FOOTBALL: ‘COMPLETE’ ST EUNAN’S PERFORMANCE SEES MINOR GIRLS TO FINAL WIN

first_imgST Eunan’s ladies landed the County Minor C Championship in convincing fashion with a well-worked win over Naomh Muire at Red Hughs GAA grounds this morning.Grainne Gallagher was the star of the show as she hit four of Eunan’s six goals in the 6-05 to 0-03 win.Sara Boyle and Naomi McMenamin hit the other goals. The entry fee to the double header was worth it just to see Eunan’s keeper Aisling Nee dive full stretch to turn a Naomh Muire penalty away.The Annagry girls came up short on the day for whom Saoirse Bonner had an excellent performance.  LADIES FOOTBALL: ‘COMPLETE’ ST EUNAN’S PERFORMANCE SEES MINOR GIRLS TO FINAL WIN was last modified: September 19th, 2015 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:ChampionsLadies FootballSt Eunan’s Minorslast_img read more

Bush set to unveil super-flu strategy today

first_imgWASHINGTON – Vaccine improvement is expected to take center stage in the Bush administration’s preparations for a worldwide flu outbreak, with a potential travel ban and restrictions on global commerce part of the contingency planning. President George W. Bush today will announce his strategy on how to prepare for the next flu pandemic – preparations expected to cost at least $6.5 billion – whether it is caused by the worrisome Asian bird flu or some other super-strain of influenza. A key element: States and cities will get their first specific instructions from federal health officials on such things as who should get limited doses of vaccines and the antiviral medications Tamiflu or Relenza. Topping that list are workers involved in manufacturing flu vaccine, health workers caring for the ill, and other first responders such as police and ambulance drivers, said a public health specialist shown a recent version of the plan. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week More details are to be released a day after Bush’s speech at the National Institutes of Health. The president first will stress that it will take more than the federal government to battle a super-flu. “It’s akin to the Rosie-the-riveter type thing, because we are asking every American and every American institution to do quite a bit,” said White House spokesman Trent Duffy. “America has this tough-it-out strategy when you get sick. You aren’t helping yourself or the country going to work when you get ill. You are potentially threatening a greater health issue if you send children to school when they are sick,” Duffy said. Pandemics strike when the easy-to-mutate influenza virus shifts to a strain that people have never experienced before, something that has happened three times in the last century. While it is impossible to say when the next super-flu will strike, concern is growing that the bird flu strain known as H5N1 could trigger one if it mutates to start spreading easily among people. Since 2003, at least 62 people in Southeast Asia have died from H5N1; most regularly handled poultry. The nation’s strategy starts with attempting to spot an outbreak abroad early and working to contain it before it reaches the United States. International cooperation “represents a best hope of stopping the lightning spread of a pandemic,” Duffy said. There is a possibility that a pandemic would force restrictions of international travel and commerce, he said. That’s one reason, Duffy said, that “the president recognizes, and we all recognize, that we need to manufacture the vaccine here in America.” Today, most of the world’s vaccine against regular winter flu, including much of that used by Americans each flu season, is manufactured in factories in Britain and Europe. The government already has ordered $162.5 million worth of vaccine to be made and stockpiled against the Asian bird flu, more than half to be made in a U.S. factory. But the administration plan calls for more than stockpiling shots. It will stress a new method of manufacturing flu vaccines – growing the virus to make them in easy-to-handle cell cultures instead of today’s cumbersome process that uses millions of chicken eggs – as well as incentives for new U.S.-based vaccine factories to open. Such steps will take several years to implement, but the hope is that eventually they could allow production of enough vaccine to go around within six months of a pandemic’s start. “The notion is that prevention beats therapy,” said Dr. William Schaffner of Vanderbilt University, an influenza specialist who advises the government on vaccination and has received some information about the plan. Antiviral drugs like Tamiflu, however, are expected to provide both treatment and some protection against catching a super-flu until vaccines can be distributed. Last-minute discussions included how much Tamiflu to stockpile, with one possibility that the federal government would stockpile enough for 44 million people and tell states to purchase, collectively, another 31 million treatment courses. Hoping to spur the long-awaited pandemic plan, the Senate last week passed $8 billion in emergency funding for Bush to spend on the preparations. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Though Hes Still Battling Cancer Stuart Scott of ESPN

Stuart Scott, the ESPN host who is battling a rare form of cancer, posted on Twitter that rumors that he has been placed in hospice are false.His tweet read: “Rumor bout me in hospice. Not True. Airball. Swing & a miss. I continue treatment for C & missed some work but Hospice? No. Fighting? YES!”This summer, Scott—known for coining phrases like “Cool as the other side of the pillow”—gave a heart-wrenching speech at the ESPY Awards when he accepted the Jimmy V Award.Scott, 49, has been battling cancer in his stomach for seven years. He had his appendix removed and endured chemotherapy and radiation, and yet the cancer continues to return.Last month, Scott was greeted to an enormous ovation at the North Carolina Tar Heels’ Midnight Madness to kick off the basketball season. Scott attended UNC.“When you die, it does not mean that you lose to cancer,” Scott said then. “You beat cancer by how you live, why you live, and in the manner in which you live.”He said he is encouraged to battle against the disease primarily because of his two daughters.During Scott’s acceptance of the Jimmy V Perseverance Award, he said:“I listened to what Jim Valvano said 21 years ago, the most poignant seven words ever uttered in any speech anywhere: ‘Don’t give up. Don’t ever give up.’ Those great people didn’t. Coach Valvano didn’t. So to be honored with this, I now have a responsibility to also not ever give up. I’m not special. I just listened to what the man said.”His strength in the face of the disease has been admirable. He has missed chunks of time from work as he deals with treatment. read more

10 DataSecurity Measures You Cant Do Without

first_img 6 min read November 4, 2010 Brought to you by Business Insider Register Now » Data security should be an important area of concern for every small-business owner. When you consider all the important data you store virtually — from financial records, to customers’ private information — it’s not hard to see why one breach could seriously damage your business.According to the most recent Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report [PDF], an estimated “285 million records were compromised in 2008.” And 74 percent of those incidents were from outside sources.We consulted Roland Cloutier, Chief Security Officer for ADP and a board member for the National Cyber Security Alliance, and Matt Watchinski, Senior Director of the Vulnerability Research Team for cybersecurity provider Sourcefire, to find out the key security measures every small business should be taking.1. Establish strong passwordsImplementing strong passwords is the easiest thing you can do to strengthen your security.Cloutier shares his tip for crafting a hard-to-crack password: use a combination of capital and lower-case letters, numbers and symbols and make it 8 to 12 characters long.According to Microsoft, you should definitely avoid using: any personal data (such as your birthdate), common words spelled backwards and sequences of characters or numbers, or those that are close together on the keyboard.Use their convenient password checker to see how strong yours is.As for how often you should change your password, Cloutier says that the industry standard is “every 90 days,” but don’t hesitate to do it more frequently if your data is highly-sensitive.Another key: make sure every individual has their own username and password for any login system, from desktops to your CMS. “Never just use one shared password,” says Cloutier.And finally, “Never write it down!” he adds.2. Put up a strong firewallIn order to have a properly protected network, “firewalls are a must,” Cloutier says.A firewall protects your network by controlling internet traffic coming into and flowing out of your business. They’re pretty standard across the board — Cloutier recommends any of the major brands.3. Install antivirus protectionAntivirus and anti-malware software are essentials in your arsenal of online security weapons, as well.”They’re the last line of defense” should an unwanted attack get through to your network, Cloutier explains.4. Update your programs regularlyMaking sure your computer is “properly patched and updated” is a necessary step towards being fully protected; there’s little point in installing all this great software if you’re not going to maintain it right.”Your security applications are only as good as their most recent update,” Watchinski explains. “While applications are not 100 percent fool-proof, it is important to regularly update these tools to help keep your users safe.”Frequently updating your programs keeps you up-to-date on any recent issues or holes that programmers have fixed.5. Secure your laptopsBecause of their portable nature, laptops are at a higher risk of being lost or stolen than average company desktops. It’s important to take some extra steps to make certain your sensitive data is protected.Cloutier mandates “absolutely: encrypt your laptop. It’s the easiest thing to do.”Encryption software changes the way information looks on the harddrive so that, without the correct password, it can’t be read.Cloutier also stresses the importance of never, ever leaving your laptop in your car, where it’s an easy target for thieves. If you must, lock it in your trunk.6. Secure your mobile phonesCloutier points out that smartphones hold so much data these days that you should consider them almost as valuable as company computers — and they’re much more easily lost or stolen. As such, securing them is another must.The must-haves for mobile phones:Encryption softwarePassword-protection (Cloutier also suggests enabling a specific “lock-out” period, wherein after a short amount of time not being used, the phone locks itself)Remote wiping enabledRemote wiping is “extremely effective,” Cloutier says, recounting the story of one executive who lost his Blackberry in an airport, after he had been looking at the company’s quarter financials. The exec called IT in a panic, and within 15 minutes they were able to completely wipe the phone.7. Backup regularlyScheduling regular backups to an external hard drive, or in the cloud, is a painless way to ensure that all your data is stored safely.The general rule of thumb for backups: servers should have a complete backup weekly, and incremental backups every night; personal computers should also be backed up completely every week, but you can do incremental backups every few days if you like (“however long you could live without your data,” Cloutier explains).Getting your data compromised is a painful experience — having it all backed up so you don’t completely lose it will make it much less so.8. Monitor diligently”All this great technology […] is no good unless you actually use it. You have to have someone be accountable for it,” says Cloutier.One good monitoring tool Cloutier suggests is data-leakage prevention software, which is set up at key network touchpoints to look for specific information coming out of your internal network. It can be configured to look for credit card numbers, pieces of code, or any bits of information relevant to your business that would indicate a breach.If you don’t monitor things, warns Cloutier, “it’s a waste of time and a waste of resources.” And you won’t know that you’ve been compromised until it’s far too late.9. Be careful with e-mail, IM and surfing the WebIt’s not uncommon for a unsuspecting employee to click on a link or download an attachment that they believe is harmless — only to discover they’ve been infected with a nasty virus, or worse.”Links are the numbers one way that malware ends up on computers,” says Cloutier. “Links are bad!”As such, never click on a link that you weren’t expecting or you don’t know the origination of in an e-mail or IM.You have to “be smart when surfing the Web,” Watchinski warns. “[You] should take every “warning box” that appears on [your] screen seriously and understand that every new piece of software comes with its own set of security vulnerabilities.”10. Educate your employeesTeaching your employees about safe online habits and proactive defense is crucial.”Educating them about what they are doing and why it is dangerous is a more effective strategy than expecting your IT security staff to constantly react to end users’ bad decisions,” Watchinski says.It’s not easy: “One of the most difficult things to do is protect end users against themselves,” he adds. But ultimately, prevention is the best approach to handling your data security.Make sure your employees understand how important your company’s data is, and all the measures they can take to protect it. Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Globallast_img read more