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Whew, that’s done!

first_imgFor many, writing a senior thesis is the ultimate academic challenge of College life. About half of Harvard students undertake this weighty endeavor, which is required only for honors students at most Schools. On deadline day, their original research, writing, and tortured all-nighters are sometimes rewarded with interdepartmental parties featuring cake and champagne.More tributes follow the March filings — at least for a lucky few — in early May with the announcement of the Hoopes Prize, which recognizes outstanding undergraduate research. A few days later, the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) holds its annual Design & Project Fair, where dean’s awards are bestowed for outstanding engineering projects.Lyra Wanzer ’19, who built an electroadhesive treaded microrobot, was one of this year’s four winners. She was delighted. “I put so much work and time in this,” said Wanzer, a Vermont native who fell in love with robotics in high school. “So many hours for a whole year.”Students in the engineering bachelor’s program at SEAS are required to work on a capstone project, similar to a thesis, which aims to solve a real-world problem. Wanzer built a 6-centimeter-long microrobot with treads like a military tank. It can stick to conductive surfaces and could be used for search and rescue operations or inspecting pipes, engines, and other places where the human hand can’t reach.Across the University, the thesis is a rite of passage that students approach with mixed feelings. There is dread about the amount of work involved — each thesis must be between 10,000 and 20,000 words, 60 to 100 pages, and involve original research — but also a deep feeling of accomplishment once it’s finally done.Such was the case for David Shayne ’19, who is concentrating in social studies with a secondary in visual and environmental studies. Shayne handed in his thesis on the history of the American economic crises one hour before the deadline. He was tired after sleeping little in the previous 48 hours, but mostly overwhelmed by pride and joy.“I’m exhausted and stunned that the thesis exists and that I produced so many pages [about 100],” he said, looking a bit disheveled on the March 13 deadline. “I did my thesis by the sheer tyranny of will. It’s a weird and wonderful feeling.”,In most Schools a thesis is optional, but it is a requirement for students on the honors track. About half of all students across the College pursue honors within their concentrations; the numbers vary according to Schools and departments. Lauren Bimmler, undergraduate program administrator in the English Department, said 34 out of 48 seniors there are on the honors track.A lower percentage of SEAS students write senior theses. This year, 42 out of 140 computer science concentrators wrote one, as did 30 out of 100 students concentrating in applied mathematics.For Hyo-Won Jeon, who is concentrating in social studies, working on her thesis meant sacrifice. When she handed it in, she felt relieved.“Every day was truly a test,” said Jeon, who spent the night before the deadline at the library working on her paper on intercountry adoptees who don’t have U.S. citizenship. “The hardest part was not being able to spend time with my friends because I was working.”Students don’t undertake the challenge alone. The University offers tutorials, seminars, and workshops on how to choose a topic, do research, and write the thesis, and assigns advisers who guide students through the whole process. They may also apply for grants for research and travel.For seniors in the S.B. engineering program, SEAS requires the two-semester capstone course “Engineering Design Projects” (ES 100). This year’s projects showed a wide array of interests, from a 3D-printable implant to replace part of the ear’s canal wall to a wearable device that provides early detection of infection in pediatric patients to a portable gadget that measures atmospheric mercury levels.Seniors concentrating in applied mathematics also demonstrated a broad array of interests, said Sarah Iams, assistant director of undergraduate studies in applied mathematics.Hyo-Won Jeon (right) hands in her thesis to Nicole Dejong Newendorp. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer“It’s a cool, wide range of topics, from sports theses to economic questions to decoding Inca quipus,” said Iams.In the English Department, students can write critical or creative theses. Bimmler said creative theses, such as collections of poems or short stories, novellas, and screenplays, are on the rise. Two years ago, Obasi Shaw ’17 turned in “Liminal Minds,” the first rap album ever submitted at the English Department.This year, there were 13 creative theses and next year officials anticipate 23, said Bimmler.For many students the best part of tackling a thesis is that they can choose any topic, depending on their interests or fields of study. Among this year’s Hoopes Prize winners are works on female judges and crime in India, American country music in Italy, Nazis in America, gang violence in El Salvador, and the spread of the invasive strawberry guava in Madagascar’s rainforests.Schools have different deadlines for students to turn in their theses. In the Social Studies Department, it’s always the Wednesday before spring break to allow students enjoy the recess without any thesis-related concerns. At SEAS, it’s the last Friday of March.On deadline day, some Schools hold small parties with champagne, cake, and hors d’oeuvres to cheer on students as they arrive with the product of their labor. It’s a well-deserved celebration, said Anya Bernstein Bassett, senior lecturer and director of studies in social studies.“They take on an independent project and go through the ups and downs because there are always challenges,” said Bassett. “Your interview subjects won’t talk to you, you go to a field site and it’s not what you expected, and they have to manage through that. It says so much about who they are and how committed they are.”Senior lecturer Anya Bassett (from left) accepts theses from Layla Siddig, Rohan Shah, and Anwar Omeish. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff PhotographerJuliana Rodrigues ’19, who’s concentrating in social studies, shared the sentiment.“It’s a capstone for your educational experience at Harvard,” she said. “It’s a way to reflect back on everything you’ve learned in your time here and bring that all together that speaks to who you are and what you value.”Anna Antongiorgi ’19 is concentrating in English with a secondary in Theater, Dance & Media. Her creative thesis was both an intellectual and emotional enterprise. She wrote a collection of 120 poems inspired by her love of writing and dancing.In many ways, the paper didn’t feel like homework, said Antongiorgi, who began dancing at age 5 and started writing poems in high school. At times, it was cathartic, at times overwhelming, but mostly it was enjoyable. The process has led her to ponder new possibilities.“I’m still writing,” said Antongiorgi. “It felt like it was just the beginning. I don’t feel finished.”last_img read more

Marc Marquez wins Australia MotoGP thriller as Vinales crashes

first_img Press Trust Of India WATCH US LIVE World champion Marc Marquez secured his 11th victory of the season at the Australian MotoGP after disaster struck fellow Spaniard Maverick Vinales, who crashed on the last lap. The Monster Energy Yamaha rider had dominated all weekend at Phillip Island and was leading for much of the race until Repsol Honda’s Marquez darted past in the dying stages. In desperate bid to retake the lead, Vinales pushed too hard and skidded out to hand his gifted rival, who clinched his sixth MotoGP world title in Thailand this month, a fifth win in a row. Britain’s Cal Crutchlow, who suffered career-threatening injuries at Phillip Island last year, came second on his LCR-Honda with Australian Jack Miller third on a Ducati. Italian veteran Valentino Rossi, racing in an amazing 400th Grand Prix, was eighth. First Published: 27th October, 2019 13:53 IST “It was an incredible, incredible victory because today we were not the fastest on the racetrack,” said Marquez, who became Honda’s most successful ever premier class rider with his 55th win surpassing Australian great Mick Doohan. “Maverick was fastest but I was waiting for him… and I did a strong move to pass, it was the only chance for me. “The whole weekend has been crazy,” he added, after qualifying was called off on Saturday due to strong winds and instead run on Sunday morning. Asked about becoming Honda’s most successful ever rider, he said: “They are the biggest manufacturer in the world, so I’m happy and just enjoying the dream.”  Written By SUBSCRIBE TO US Last Updated: 27th October, 2019 13:53 IST Marc Marquez Wins Australia MotoGP Thriller As Vinales Crashes World champion Marc Marquez secured his 11th victory of the season at the Australian MotoGP after disaster struck fellow Spaniard Maverick Vinales, who crashedcenter_img READ | Manika Batra praises PM Modi’s efforts to empower women”Very special”It was a crushing loss for Vinales, who won in Australia last year and started from pole, having reigned supreme through practice and qualifying. He had a terrible start, slipping to sixth as Rossi powered to the lead before and disaster for exciting French rookie Fabio Quartararo in an incident-packed first lap. Quartararo, who was second to Marquez in Japan last weekend, and Danilo Petrucci collided, crashing out at turn two.READ | Tiger Woods widens lead at Zozo ChampionshipIt was a sobering end for the 20-year-old, who was second on the grid after having to go through preliminary qualifying (Q1) for the first time following a nasty spill in Friday practice. By lap four Crutchlow had moved into the lead, but Vinales and Marquez were starting to apply pressure and by lap 10 Vinales was in front with his rival stalking him. They began to put the hammer down and pull clear of the field as it turned into a two-horse race, leaving the rest in a dog fight for third.Marquez was riding on the limit, giving everything he had to stay in touch and finally edged past Vinales at the start of the final lap before the late drama as drops of rain started to fall. Crutchlow was ecstatic about making the podium after the horrors of last year, when he fractured his ankle and had to undergo surgery. “Crashes don’t normally phase me but that one has haunted me all year,” he said after his best result of 2019. “I was not happy coming to this Grand Prix thinking about it, about what could happen, so to have a podium back here is very, very special.” READ | Rowers sparkle with gold in Asian Championship on a Diwali DayREAD | Boxer Deepak wins silver, Balaji claims bronze in Military World Games FOLLOW US COMMENT WE RECOMMEND LIVE TV 10 months ago Marquez keen to atone for chequered Australia historylast_img read more

Lakers’ Frank Vogel was among the first to give Paul George an NBA chance

first_imgEL SEGUNDO — The last time they spoke, fires raged in the hills of Los Angeles.When the Getty Fire threatened several residential areas in late October, there were more than a few NBA players who were fearful they might have to relocate, Paul George among them. That was when he heard from his old coach, Frank Vogel, offering him a place to stay if he needed it.“He reached out, giving support, ‘If you need anything,’” George said last week. “If we need a house to stay, he opened the doors for me. But he’s got his thing going, and I got mine.”That’s the kind of relationship Vogel and George, a player-and-coach tandem that had a six-year run with the Indiana Pacers have now. It’s close, like family, but distant, which can also be like family. Even though they share the same city, and even though they presumably see each other’s faces on billboards, hear each other’s voices in advertisements and think a good deal about how to beat one another, there’s space between them that’s hard to bridge – and yet in times of crisis, it’s not that hard at all. Trail Blazers beat Grizzlies in play-in, earn first-round series with the Lakers Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Trail Blazers, Grizzlies advance to NBA play-in game; Suns, Spurs see playoff dreams dashed How athletes protesting the national anthem has evolved over 17 years AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersFor his part, Vogel downplayed the exchange in October, saying it was “just what a friend would do.” But what else is he supposed to say two days before a Lakers-Clippers showdown on Christmas Day at Staples Center? Even while Anthony Davis and LeBron James are questionable for the game, Vogel’s connection with George, who missed the first Lakers-Clippers meeting, gives the nationally televised matchup a bit of an edge.“I love those guys and they’ll be family forever,” he said, lumping in George with other old Pacers. “But on Christmas Day, they’re the enemy. He’s the enemy, I guess. The Clippers are.”As much as Vogel might play down the relationship, the two men are inexorably linked for the effect they had on one another’s careers.George was a raw rookie when Vogel took over as interim coach in 2011, and it was Vogel who gave him his first career start. As George grew into a headlining superstar in Indiana, Vogel’s teams took off, reaching the Eastern Conference finals in back-to-back seasons in 2013 and 2014.There’s a certain irony that the coach who would shelter him from the fire was the one who threw him into it at the beginning of his career.center_img “He definitely helped with my development by throwing me out there, throwing me into the fire, giving me that experience, letting me learn on the fly, make mistakes,” George said. “He definitely helped with my development of just film work, watching games, watching plays. The experience is what helped the most by allowing me to play and letting me learn and just being out there.”True to form, Vogel said George’s minutes were ones he earned by playing defense.“Offensively, he was very raw and had a long way to go from a development standpoint and from perimeter shooting and passing the basketball,” he said. “You can’t grow if you’re not getting opportunities on the court. … Since he had in his rookie year the ability to stay on the floor defensively, that’s what gave me confidence to throw him out there for long stretches and help him grow his offensive game.”Related Articles Lakers, Clippers schedules set for first round of NBA playoffs Lakers practice early hoping to answer all questions George’s injury in 2014, a compound fracture of his lower leg, had a disastrous impact for Indiana the following year, and it was the first big backstep for Vogel’s Pacers. After the next season, when the Pacers stagnated and lost in the first round, Vogel and Indiana parted ways in 2016. A year later, George requested a trade out of Indiana.Nate McMillan recently acknowledged it was odd to see Vogel teaming up with LeBron James, the player that those Pacers attempted to unseat for years. But in a way, George seemed to understand why the Lakers scooped him up. In grinding seasons, Vogel helped pick up the team.“My whole time what made it so remarkable and so great with the system that he had was just positive, very positive influence, and it was great,” George said. “Tough days, long days, tough road trips, he always found the positive and it was great. It was a great flow to the locker room and it translated onto the court.”BRIEFLYThe Lakers said James (thoracic muscle strain) and Davis (right knee soreness) are both questionable for Wednesday’s game against the Clippers. … The Lakers participated in Secret Santa on Monday. Kyle Kuzma said he received a shoulder bag from Davis, while he gifted Quinn Cook with a kitchen table.Mirjam Swanson contributed to this story.last_img read more

Top coaches honoured with England Golf awards

first_img22 Nov 2018 Top coaches honoured with England Golf awards Tags: Awards, Coaches, England squads, Northumberland, Nottinghamshire, performance Northumberland’s JJ Vallely and Nottinghamshire’s David Ridley have both been honoured with coaching awards from England Golf.They were recognised at a gala dinner at the annual coaching conference at Woodhall Spa Golf Club, the home of England Golf.Vallely, from Matfen Hall and coach to the England Golf North region girls’ squad, was named Squad Coach of the Year.A Special Recognition Award was presented to David Ridley of Coxmoor Golf Club to mark his retirement after 32 years as an England coach.Three outstanding girl golfers who have all come through the North squad have helped to shine the spotlight on the work of JJ Vallely (pictured top, right).Cumbria’s Caitlin Whitehead won European Young Masters and then helped Europe to a clean sweep in the Asia Pacific Junior Championship, while Northumberland’s Jess Baker and Rosie Belsham have played their way convincingly on to the national scene.“There’s a lot more waiting in the wings,” said Vallely. “They’re on a mission, they’ve been pulled along by watching Caitlin, Rosie and Jess, they’re inspired and it’s given them belief and made them work harder. It’s like a mini-explosion and we want to keep it going.”Vallely, who is supported by squad manager Bryan Ross, ensures there’s a pipeline of talent by also coaching the girls in the North of England Futures, made up of players who are pushing for places in the regional line-up. Baker and Belsham were among the early intake and together with two other girls, knocked a total of 50 shots off their handicaps in their first season.Vallely, who has been involved with England training for about 12 years, commented: “I absolutely love it, I live and breathe it. You do make a lot of sacrifices, but it’s really satisfying to help them understand their game and themselves. Some of the skills and habits they develop are wider reaching than golf and will stand them in good stead with whatever they do.”David Ridley (pictured left)  has bowed out of England coaching after 32 years with the national and regional squads and teams. His award was greeted with a standing ovation and he remarked: “It’s a privilege and an honour to receive this – and quite a shock too!”Ridley first became involved as a regional boys’ coach in 1986, but from 1997 he worked with the national men’s squads and players such as Tommy Fleetwood, Chris Woods, Eddie Pepperell and Andy Sullivan.“I’ve been very fortunate,” he said, adding “They still keep in touch, they send a text. They’re just great lads.”He’s been involved in two European team championship victories and numerous Home International wins. His personal highlight was the European gold medal of 2010, when England beat Sweden in Sweden after losing in the previous two finals.Ridley, who was made a Master Professional by the PGA earlier this year, also enjoyed an outstanding playing career. He represented GB&I against the USA in two PGA Cup matches, in 1979 and 1981, helping the team to a win and a draw. He also played in five Open championships between 1969 and 1984. He’s semi-retired now but continues to coach at Coxmoor.Vallely and Ridley were recognised alongside two other award winners. Paul Cannons of Kingsdown and Walmer Golf Club, Kent, is the Volunteer Manager of the Year and Les Walker of Selby Golf Club, Yorkshire, received the Award for Excellence in Coaching in recognition of his contribution as an England and GB&I selector.Captions: Top, John Vallely (right) receives his award from England Golf Chief Executive Nick Pink. Above, David Ridley (left) receives his award from England men’s coach Graham Walker. (Images copyright Vicki Head).last_img read more