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Evolutionists Try to Out-Complex Behe

first_imgThe phrase irreducible complexity has reluctantly entered the working vocabulary of evolutionary biologists, though they usually disparage its source (Dr. Michael Behe, leading proponent of intelligent design).  The latest evidence is a paper in Science that was titled with an obvious play on words and an attempt to refute Behe’s principle.  They called it “irremediable complexity.”1     The team of biologists from Canada and the Czech Republic neither referenced Behe’s book nor mentioned his name, but it is clear they wanted to refute his thesis that complex molecular machines require intelligent design.  “Many of the cell’s macromolecular machines appear gratuitously complex, comprising more components than their basic functions seem to demand,” they said.  “How can we make sense of this complexity in the light of evolution?”  As examples, they produced the spliceosome and ribosome, structures they claim have “Seemingly gratuitous complexity”.  From the gratuitous, they invoked the fortuitous, in a somewhat circuitous manner.  By chance, they said, two independent bodies might become connected.  As additional mutations occur, it becomes more difficult for them to separate than to remain interdependent.  That’s the reason for their phrase “irremediable complexity” – there’s no going back.  The result is a kind of “ratchet” mechanism that increases complexity and interdependence, but not necessarily adaptation: “Thus, constructive neutral evolution is a directional force that drives increasing complexity without positive (and in small populations, against mildly negative) selection,” they explained.  “Negative selection is involved, but only as the stabilizing force that keeps this directionality from reversing.”2    How, then, does adaptation occur?  The ribosome and spliceosome, after all, are tremendously effective machines despite their complexity, gratuitous or not.  The authors seem to say that the function must have been already been present before the complexity accumulated:Although compensation for defects caused by “selfish” (self-propagating) DNA elements may seem intuitive, it is problematic to propose that, on the way to evolving compensatory machinery, an intermediate state had to exist that was less fit than its ancestors and sisters.  Why would such an intermediate not just die out in competition before its rescue by compensatory complexity yet to be invented?  A more workable model is that the compensating mechanism was already present (possibly serving unrelated functions).They were thus trying to solve one problem with evolutionary theory (adaptationism) by introducing another – a kind of “pre-adaptation” inherent in the machinery that turned on when the circumstances needed it.  This ratchet model, called “constructive neutral evolution,” they claimed, “provides an explanatory counterpoint to the selectionist or adaptationist views that pervade molecular biology.”  To support their model, therefore, they had to take issue with the vast majority of evolutionists who support Neo-Darwinism.    In the end, though, this was all about refuting Michael Behe’s claim that molecular machines illustrate intelligent design:Although this model is easiest to illustrate using molecular systems of peripheral importance or limited distribution (such as splicing or RNA editing), there is no reason why it might not contribute to the generation of any cellular complexity (the ribosome; mitochondrial respiratory complexes; light-harvesting antennae in photosynthetic organisms; RNA and DNA polymerases and their initiation, elongation, and termination complexes; protein import, folding, and degradation apparatuses; the cytoskeleton and its motors).  Much of the bewildering intricacy of cells could consist of originally fortuitous molecular interactions that have become more or less fixed by constructive neutral evolution.  Indeed, although complexity in biology is generally regarded as evidence of “fine tuning” or “sophistication,” large biological conglomerates might be better interpreted as the consequences of runaway bureaucracy—as biological parallels of nonsensically complex Rube Goldberg machines that are over-engineered to perform a single task.Readers of Behe’s Darwin’s Black Box (Free Press, 1996) might recall that on p. 75 he reproduced a Rube Goldberg cartoon as an illustration of irreducible complexity.1.  Michael W. Gray, Julius Lukes, John M. Archibald, Patrick J. Keeling, W. Ford Doolittle, “Irremediable Complexity?”, Science, 12 November 2010: Vol. 330. no. 6006, pp. 920-921, DOI: 10.1126/science.1198594.2.  In evolutionary theory, positive selection means increased fitness, whereas negative selection removes deleterious mutations.  Stabilizing selection works to keep things running in place with neither progress nor regress.The shameless, aimless, lameness game these guys played with words and concepts, invoking the Stuff Happens Law (SHL) as a scientific explanation (09/22/2009, 10/03/2010, 11/10/2010), refusing to acknowledge the name of Behe, and calling the most marvelous living machines ever discovered (including ATP synthase and the respiratory chain! – 09/22/2010) a bunch of slapdash accidents, is breathtaking.  This is another example of evolutionist ideologues talking nonsense to themselves in an echo chamber.  Science never gives Behe a chance to respond, or anyone else.  They did us all one favor, though – falsifying neo-Darwinism.    Their astounding list of machines they claim could be explained by “constructive neutral evolution” (a.k.a. SHL in a cheap tuxedo) shows also how ungrateful they are.  Those machines are keeping them alive.  They are keeping their brains capable of thinking and reasoning.  If they thought for a minute about the stupidity of their SHL theory, and the intricate complexity of those machines – the molecular trucks, proofreaders, editors, repair crews, and more – their response ought to be awe and thankfulness.  Instead, they became vain in their imaginations, neither were thankful (ref.).    The spliceosomes they claim are gratuitously complex are exquisitely functional.  Have these biologists never heard of alternative splicing?  The splicing machinery generates a multitude of protein products from the same DNA transcription (02/02/2010).  There are reasons these machines are complex, and the proof of the pudding is the brain that allows these scientists to think (although, like pudding, their thinking is mushy).    For them to think that the fortuitous (happenstance) produced the gratuitous (unplanned), they are not only reasoning circuitously, they are showing themselves to be muddle-headed ingrates.  What they need is fortitude and gratitude.  Then they might become circumspect, like they were designed to be.(Visited 47 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Reporter.co.za: the people’s news

first_img13 January 2005Citizen reporting has taken off in South Africa with the launch of reporter.co.za – the first website in the country to allow ordinary people to write the news as they see it.With the slogan “for the people, by the people”, reporter.co.za has already signed up some 800 contributors of all ages, races and occupations to write for the site, which produced its first edition on Monday.According to online encyclopedia Wikipedia, citizen journalism allows ordinary people to “play an active role in the process of collecting, reporting, analysing and disseminating news and information.“The intent of this participation is to provide independent, reliable, accurate, wide-ranging and relevant information that a democracy requires.”Citizen journalism also allows people to provide their own footage of events, taken with their camera or camera phone. The BBC has eyewitness photos, taken with cellphones, of the London bombings in July last year and the 2004 tsunami in Asia. In South Africa earlier this year, a schoolchild used his cellphone in class to capture an attack on his teacher by another pupil.Reporter.co.za has been made possible by both the digital revolution and South Africa’s economic boom, which have brought the internet, cellphones and digital cameras to millions of ordinary people. In South Africa, one in 12 people have access to the internet and over 18-million have cellphones. In Africa as a whole, there are 82-million cellphone users, according to World Wide Worx and Vodafone.Vincent Maher, director of the New Media Lab at Rhodes University’s School of Journalism and Media Studies, describes the website as “the most progressive move by a South African media company in the past two years”.Produced by Johnnic Communications, Reporter.co.za is modelled on the Korean website ohmynews.com, which has over 39 000 grassroots reporters covering news, leisure and sport.“The newsroom with 20 journalists, who are all skilled in different areas, will mentor and assist the reporter, before we publish,” Juliette Saunders, editor of reporter.co.za, told the Mail & Guardian. “The public will tell us what the news is.“On reporter.co.za people can do what they want,” Saunders added. “We don’t have any control over the product. And if people start sending in stories about what happened on their street corner, that would be fabulous.“If you have a passionate interest in baseball, but there is not one newspaper that wants to publish your story, we are the platform,” Saunders said. “I am not afraid that no one will read those stories because people won’t write stories to bore other people.”Reporter.co.za is a platform for any story written by anyone, as long as they get the facts right. To ensure credibility, the 20 professional journalists both check facts and train the amateurs in newsroom essentials.The reporters are paid a nominal fee for their work, starting from R25. If the story makes it into Johnnic’s conventional publications, which include the Sunday Times, Sowetan, Sunday World and Daily Dispatch, professional rates are paid.“Today I might be reporting about a crime that happened across the street, and tomorrow about a car accident. I’ll report about everything that is newsworthy,” Dolpy Rakgoale (27), a security officer working in downtown Johannesburg, told the Mail & Guardian.“I have been waiting for such a thing to happen since I was young. I always wanted to be a reporter,” Rakgoale said. “I like investigating things, and an investigative story will one day make me famous.”SouthAfrica.info reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Researchers look at lower-cost alternative protein source for pig diets

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Threonine is an indispensable amino acid, which is often provided in supplement form in swine diets. With U.S. production of crystalline amino acids increasing, more co-products from amino acid production are becoming available, and these co-products can also be fed to pigs. Researchers at the University of Illinois are investigating a co-product of synthetic threonine as a lower-cost alternative protein source to fish meal.“To create synthetic threonine, you ferment a carbohydrate substrate using selected strains of bacteria, then extract the crystalline L-threonine from the fermentation product,” said Hans H. Stein, a professor of animal sciences at U of I. “The biomass that’s left over, even though most of the threonine has been extracted, is still rich in amino acids. If those amino acids are well digested by pigs, this could be a good source of protein.”Stein and his fellow researchers conducted two experiments comparing threonine biomass with fish meal. In the first experiment, they determined the concentration and digestibility of protein and amino acids in both ingredients. Threonine biomass contained 81.8% crude protein on an as-fed basis, compared with 65.6% crude protein in fish meal. The standardized ileal digestibility was greater in threonine biomass than in fish meal for crude protein, as well as for all indispensable amino acids except tryptophan. Overall, the average digestibility of amino acids in threonine biomass was 83.5%, compared with 72.3% for fish meal.In the second experiment, Stein’s team determined that threonine biomass contained about 25% more digestible and metabolizable energy than fish meal. On a dry matter basis, threonine biomass contained 4,935 kcal per kilogram of digestible energy and 4,335 kcal per kilogram of metabolizable energy, versus 3,957 and 3,508 kcal per kilogram respectively in fish meal.“The results from these studies indicate that threonine biomass can be used as an alternative to fish meal, and possibly other animal proteins, in diets for weanling pigs,” Stein said.The study, “Amino acid digestibility and concentration of digestible and metabolizable energy in a threonine biomass product fed to weanling pigs,” was co-authored by Ferdinando Almeida and Rommel Sulabo. The study was funded by Archer Daniel Midland Company, Decatur, Ill., and was published in a recent volume of the Journal of Animal Science. It is available online at https://www.animalsciencepublications.org/publications/jas/articles/92/10/4540.last_img read more

Ohio Cattlemen’s Association BEST Program concludes a successful 17th year at annual banquet

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The 2015-2016 Ohio Cattlemen’s Association (OCA) BEST (Beef Exhibitor Show Total) Program wrapped up on May 7 with its annual awards banquet held at the Ohio Expo Center in Columbus.“The banquet is a time to celebrate the many achievements of our BEST participants, both in and out of the show ring,” said Stephanie Sindel, BEST coordinator. “Each participant is recognized for their hard work by family, friends and BEST supporters alike.”Several representatives from program sponsors, Bob Evans Farms, Burroughs Frazier Farms, Farm Credit Mid-America, M.H. Eby, Ohio Farm Bureau Federation and Weaver Livestock, were on hand to help present awards totaling more than $50,000 in belt buckles, luggage, show materials and other awards.This year’s BEST program featured 15 sanctioned shows that weaved its way across the state with over 550 youth participants showing 740 head of market animals and heifers. Banquet sponsorsThe BEST program also receives tremendous support for awards and the awards banquet. The 2015-2016 banquet and award sponsors were Hamilton Insurance Agency, Harsh’s Farm Service, Heritage Cooperative, Highland Livestock Supply, Kent Nutrition Group, Merchants National Bank, United Producers, Inc. and Weaver Leather Livestock.  These sponsors donated a wonderful set of door prizes and offered monetary support for awards.State breed associations sponsoring belt buckle cases for the winners in each of the respective breeds: Buckeye Hereford Association, Ohio Angus Association, Ohio Mid-Eastern Maine-Anjou Association, Ohio Shorthorn Breeders Association and Ohio Simmental Association. The Ohio Cattlemen’s Association sponsored the remaining breeds’ winners. BEST CommitteeThe OCA BEST program functions with the strong backing of the BEST Committee. Serving on the BEST Committee are Chairman Todd Pugh, Vice-Chairman Mark Hara, Patricia Cluxton, Brandon Corry, Ashley Culp, Alice Frazier, Breanne Gabriel, Roy Norman, Bob Siegel and Bill Tom – the Ohio State Fair Beef Director. Sally Puzacke served as the Buckeye Classic show representative. During the BEST awards banquet, the new junior representatives for the 2016-2017 season were announced. They are Karigan Blue, Henry County; Brianna Ellish, Miami County; Haley Frazier, Jackson County and Kyle Piscione, Medina County. Continuing for her second term is Natalie Wagner, Brown County. Youth scholarshipsBEST participants efforts’ in academics and extracurricular activities are also recognized through the BEST Scholarship program, awarding three $1,000 scholarships. Scholarship winners were Adison Niese, Richland County; Cole Liggett; Tuscarawas County and Natalie Wagner, Brown County. Novice scholarshipsNew BEST participants were eligible to apply for a Novice sponsorship prior to the start of the BEST show season. To be eligible, youth ages 8 to 21 had to qualify for the Novice division by being first or second year BEST program participants. Novice eligible participants submitted an essay that was reviewed by a panel of judges that ranked the scholarship applications. The selected participants received a scholarship worth $105 to cover the cost of their family’s Ohio Cattlemen’s Association membership for $60 as well as one head BEST nomination fee valued at $45. Youth chosen were able to redeem their scholarship at the first BEST show they attended. The Novice scholarship program is sponsored by Weaver Leather Livestock and the recipients of the scholarship include: Evan Born, Adam and Kayler Frey, and Alexandra Sabine, Lorain County; Luke Brinksneader, Darke County; Andrew, David and Elijah Brown, Scioto County; Dana Clinedinst, Morrow County; Gage Farrar, Jackson County; Andrew and Gregory Flax, Clark County; Payton Freed, Muskingum County; Caitlyn and Joshua Gaddis, and Brandon and Peyton Hogg, Knox County; Morgan Gillespie and Luke Keifer, Butler County; Bergan Leonhardt, Crawford County; Taylor Linebaugh, Greene County; Blake Martin, Huron County; Autumn Mohler, Union County; Joseph Moody, Carroll County; Abigail Myers, Tuscarawas County; Austin Nicholl, Logan County; Evan Pope, Gallia County; Aaron Post, Mercer County; Logan and Luke Schroeder, Defiance County; Lauren and Megan Schulte, Putnam County; Emily Scott, Portage County; Alyssa Strope, Belmont County. M.H. Eby Trailer winnerParticipants in this year’s program received an entry into the drawing for the free use of an 8-foot by 26-foot Eby Trailer complete with BEST logo detailing for the 2016-2017 BEST season, donated by Eby Trailer. Participants were given an entry for every animal they showed at each show throughout the season equaling more than 4,300 entries. The lucky winner was Kinley Kreis, Adamsville, Ohio. Community Service Fundraising WinnersBEST participants worked this season to raise money for two charities, Make-A-Wish Foundation and the Ronald McDonald House. Haley Frazier, Jackson, Ohio received a $500 gift certificate for a shopping spree with Weaver Leather Livestock for collecting the most pop tabs for the Ronald McDonald House Charity. Abigail Thornton, Amanda, Ohio received a $500 gift certificate to be used on show supplies with Weaver Leather Livestock for being the top fundraiser in the Make-A-Wish project. Megan Becker, Whipple, Ohio was also a top fundraiser and received a $500 gift certificate Gift certificate winnersJosie Kidwell, Walhonding, Ohio, won the drawing for a $500 gift certificate toward the purchase of her next show animal from an OCA member. Winning a Show Pass valued at more than $850 was Hailee Carter, Millersburg, Ohio. A gas card valued at $100 was won by Josh Champer, Mount Sterling, Ohio. Novice show box drawingNovice participant Levi DeLong, Laurelville, Ohio won a new Show Box in a novice-only drawing, donated by Weaver Livestock. 15-show attendeesIt takes a lot of time and dedication for juniors and their parents to attend any of the BEST shows, but several individuals attended all 15 BEST shows across the state.  Forty-nine BEST participants won a single show pass for the 2016-2017 season.Photography contestThis year’s photography contest had top-notch entries encompassing four divisions: BEST Shows and Activities, Landscapes, People and Around the Farm. Three winners were awarded in each age division and an Editor’s Choice and Editor’s Choice Honorable Mention were selected from all submissions. The winners were as follows: Beginner Division1st Place Beginner — Morgan Love, Fairfield Co.2nd Place Beginner — Ashton Bain, Highland Co.3rd Place Beginner — Brenna Shaffer, Lake Co. Junior Division1st Place Junior- Amanda Annett, Knox Co.2nd Place Junior — Mason Love, Fairfield Co.3rd Place Junior — Amanda Annett, Knox Co. Intermediate Division1st Place Intermediate — Emily Dahse, Gallia Co.2nd Place Intermediate — Kyle Piscione, Medina Co.3rd Place Intermediate — Kathy Lehman, Richland Co. Senior Division1st Place Senior — Kelsey Decker, Fairfield Co.2nd Place Senior — Morgan Smith, Washington Co.3rd Place Senior — Morgan Smith, Washington Co. Editor’s ChoiceEditor’s Choice — Kelsey Decker, Fairfield Co.Editor’s Choice Honorable Mention — Amanda Annett, Knox Co. Heifer and Market Animal ChampionsBreed Division ChampionsAngusChampion Angus Heifer — Nevaeh Powers, Fulton Co.Reserve Champion Angus Heifer — Michelle Bockelman, Henry Co.Third Overall Angus Heifer — Jacob LeBrun, Scioto Co.Fourth Overall Angus Heifer — Ellie Kidwell, Knox Co.Fifth Overall Angus Heifer — Baylee Carey, Highland Co.Champion Angus Steer — Carly Sanders, Highland Co.Reserve Champion Angus Steer — Jacob LeBrun, Scioto Co. ChianinaChampion Chianina Heifer — Kathy Lehman, Richland Co.Reserve Champion Chianina Heifer — Abbie Collins, Preble Co.Third Overall Chianina Heifer — Jared Cluxton, Brown Co.Fourth Overall Chianina Heifer — Allison Herr, Fulton Co.Fifth Overall Chianina Heifer — Colton Burkett, Ashland Co.Champion Chianina Steer — Kinley Kreis, Muskingum Co.Reserve Champion Chianina Steer — Ethan Davies, Wood Co. HerefordChampion Hereford Heifer — Hudson Drake, Ross Co.Reserve Champion Hereford Heifer — Austin Hunker, Huron Co.Champion Hereford Steer — Noah Smith, Sandusky Co.Reserve Champion Hereford Steer — Jackson Grimes, Logan Co. Maine-AnjouChampion High % Maine-Anjou Heifer — Adison Niese, Richland Co.Reserve Champion High % Maine-Anjou Heifer — Kinley Kreis, Muskingum Co. Champion MaineTainer Heifer — Kathy Lehman, Richland Co.Reserve Champion MaineTainer Heifer — Dalton Kennedy, Adams Co.Third Overall MaineTainer Heifer — Ashley Buell, Licking Co.Fourth Overall MaineTainer Heifer — Rufus Levi Tackett, Scioto Co.Fifth Overall MaineTainer Heifer — Jordan Johnson, Gallia Co.Champion Maine-Anjou Steer — Lori Millenbaugh, Crawford Co.Reserve Champion Maine-Anjou Steer — Lindsey Pugh, Stark Co.Third Overall Maine-Anjou Steer — Victoria Waits, Fayette Co.Fourth Overall Maine-Anjou Steer — Kendal Widman, Crawford Co.Fifth Overall Maine-Anjou Steer — Clay Foor, Licking Co. ShorthornChampion Shorthorn Heifer — Taylor Morbitzer, Franklin Co.Reserve Champion Shorthorn Heifer — Jessica Millenbaugh, Crawford Co.Third Overall Shorthorn Heifer — Samantha VanVorhis, Wood Co.Fourth Overall Shorthorn Heifer — Brandee Painter, Licking Co.Fifth Overall Shorthorn Heifer — Cole McLaughlin, Monroe Co.Champion Shorthorn Steer — Emma Mathews, Clinton Co.Reserve Champion Shorthorn Steer — Tanner Cordes, Montgomery Co.Champion ShorthornPlus Heifer — Allison Davis, Carroll Co.Reserve Champion ShorthornPlus Heifer — Reilly Jacobs Bell, Muskingum Co.Champion ShorthornPlus Steer — Noah Cox, Athens Co.Reserve Champion ShorthornPlus Steer — Victoria Waits, Fayette Co. SimmentalChampion Simmental Heifer — Olivia Dickson, Licking Co.Reserve Champion Simmental Heifer — Cade Liggett, Tuscarawas Co.Champion % Simmental Heifer — Brooke Hayhurst, Wayne Co.Reserve Grand Champion % Simmental Heifer — Austin Garner, Butler Co.Third Overall % Simmental Heifer — Matthew Koverman, Scioto Co.Fourth Overall % Simmental Heifer — Tyson Woodard, Guernsey Co.Fifth Overall % Simmental Heifer — Nick McConnell, Knox Co.Champion Simmental Steer — Kinzee Shafer, Preble Co.Reserve Champion Simmental Steer — Delaney Jones, Allen Co. AOBChampion AOB Heifer — Austin Hunker, Huron, Co.Reserve Champion AOB Heifer — Austin Schneder, Clinton Co.Champion AOB Steer — Zane Davison, Madison Co.Reserve Champion AOB Steer — Kennedy Thompson, Clinton Co. MiniatureChampion Miniature Heifer — Isaac Wiley, Morrow Co.Reserve Champion Miniature Heifer — Walker Wiley, Morrow Co.Champion Miniature Steer — Franklin Kinney, Logan Co.Reserve Champion Miniature Steer — Henry Strow, Wood Co. Market HeiferChampion Market Heifer — Kendra Gabriel, Pickaway Co.Reserve Champion Market Heifer — Austin Schneder, Clinton Co.Third Overall Market Heifer — Lauren McIntosh, Brown Co.Fourth Overall Market Heifer — Caroline Blay, Portage Co.Fifth Overall Market Heifer — Rufus Levi Tackett, Scioto Co. CrossbredChampion Crossbred Heifer — Destiny LaFever, Ashland Co.Reserve Champion Crossbred Heifer — Kendra Gabriel, Pickaway Co.Third Overall Crossbred Heifer — Karlie Kennedy, Adams Co.Fourth Overall Crossbred Heifer — Kylee Bloomfield, Crawford Co.Fifth Overall Crossbred Heifer — Abbie Collins, Preble Co.Champion Crossbred Steer — Abigail Myers, Tuscarawas Co.Reserve Champion Crossbred Steer — Kendra Gabriel, Pickaway Co.Third Overall Crossbred Steer — Caden Jones, Allen Co.Fourth Overall Crossbred Steer — Lori Millenbaugh, Crawford Co.Fifth Overall Crossbred Steer — Alayna Kellar, Harrison Co.Sixth Overall Crossbred Steer — Luke Brinksneader, Darke Co.Seventh Overall Crossbred Steer — Carter Smith, Holmes Co.Eighth Overall Crossbred Steer (tie) — Alayna McIntosh, Brown Co.Eighth Overall Crossbred Steer (tie) — Jayden Shriver, Gallia Co.Ninth Overall Crossbred Steer (tie) — Jonna Goss, Hocking Co.Ninth Overall Crossbred Steer (tie) — Luke Brinksneader, Darke Co.Tenth Overall Crossbred Steer — Adam Thompson, Clinton Co.Eleventh Overall Crossbred Steer (tie) — Mindy Barr, Pickaway Co.Eleventh Overall Crossbred Steer (tie) — Danielle Hoffman, Richland Co.Twelfth Overall Crossbred Steer — Madalynn Bruckelmyer, Licking Co.Thirteenth Overall Crossbred Steer (tie) — Kelsey Crandall, Darke Co.Thirteenth Overall Crossbred Steer (tie) — Mackenzie Hursey, Tuscarawas Co.Fourteenth Overall Crossbred Steer (tie) — Brice Phelps, Union Co.Fourteenth Overall Crossbred Steer (tie) — Hayden Belleville, Wood Co.Fifteenth Overall Crossbred Steer — Caitlin Gallagher, Lorain Co. BEST Novice ChampionsHeifersChampion Novice Heifer (tie) — Olivia Dickson, Licking Co. –  Purebred SimmentalChampion Novice Heifer (tie) — Destiny LaFever, Ashland Co. — CrossbredReserve Champion Novice Heifer (tie) — Nevaeh Powers, Fulton Co. — AngusReserve Champion Novice Heifer (tie) — Kylee Bloomfield, Crawford Co. – CrossbredThird Overall Novice Heifer (tie) — Ellie Day, Ross Co. — CrossbredThird Overall Novice Heifer (tie) — Jordan Moffit, Huron Co. – CrossbredFourth Overall Novice Heifer — Gage Farrar, Jackson Co. – CrossbredFifth Overall Novice Heifer — Rufus Levi Tackett, Scioto Co. – MaineTainerSixth Overall Novice Heifer — Lauren McIntosh, Brown Co. – CrossbredSeventh Overall Novice Heifer — Hannah French, Huron Co. – CrossbredEighth Overall Novice Heifer — Maddox Cupp, Fairfield Co. – HerefordNinth Overall Novice Heifer — Allison Herr, Fulton Co. – ChianinaTenth Overall Novice Heifer — Tyson Woodard, Guernsey Co. – % Simmental Market AnimalsChampion Novice Steer — Carly Sanders, Highland Co. – AngusReserve Champion Novice Steer (tie) — Tanner Cordes, Montgomery Co. — ShorthornReserve Champion Novice Steer (tie) — Abigail Myers, Tuscarawas Co. – CrossbredThird Overall Novice Steer — Jacob LeBrun, Scioto Co. – AngusFourth Overall Novice Steer — Franklin Kinney, Logan Co. – MiniatureFifth Overall Novice Steer — Caden Jones, Allen Co. – CrossbredSixth Overall Novice Steer — Alayna Kellar, Harrison Co. – CrossbredSeventh Overall Novice Steer — Luke Brinksneader, Darke Co. – CrossbredEighth Overall Novice Steer — Ethan Davies, Wood Co. – ChianinaNinth Overall Novice Steer — Delaney Jones, Allen Co. — Purebred SimmentalTenth Overall Novice Steer — Jayden Shriver, Gallia Co. – Crossbred BEST Bred & Owned ChampionsHeifersChampion Bred & Owned Heifer — Kathy Lehman, Richland Co. – MaineTainerReserve Champion Bred & Owned Heifer— Ashley Buell, Licking Co. – MaineTainerThird Overall Bred & Owned Heifer — Jordan Johnson, Gallia Co. – MaineTainerFourth Overall Bred & Owned Heifer — Michelle Bockelman, Henry Co. – AngusFifth Overall Bred & Owned Heifer— Mya Hetrick, Sandusky Co. – Shorthorn SteersChampion Bred & Owned Steer — Wally Minges, Butler Co. – ShorthornPlusReserve Champion Bred & Owned Steer — Ian Gehret, Darke Co. — Maine-AnjouThird Overall Bred & Owned Steer — Luke McKee, Knox Co. — Maine-AnjouFourth Overall Bred & Owned Steer — Brooke Weeks, Champaign Co. — Maine-AnjouFifth Overall Bred & Owned Steer — Austin Nicholl, Logan Co. — Chianina BEST Showmanship WinnersNoviceChampion Novice Showman — Allison Herr, Fulton Co.Reserve Novice Showman — Drew Browning, Muskingum Co.Third Overall Novice Showman — Luke Brinksneader, Darke Co.Fourth Overall Novice Showman — Beau Johnson, Gallia Co.Fifth Overall Novice Showman — Dakota Warnimont, Putnam Co.Sixth Overall Novice Showman — Abigail Thornton, Fairfield Co.Seventh Overall Novice Showman — Shala Graham, Licking Co.Eighth Overall Novice Showman — Avery Moore, Erie Co.Ninth Overall Novice Showman — Levi DeLong, Ross Co.Tenth Overall Novice Showman — Paige Pence, Clark Co. BeginnerChampion Beginner Showman — Hudson Drake, Ross Co.Reserve Beginner Showman — Ellie Day, Ross Co.Third Overall Beginner Showman — Karlie Kennedy, Adams Co.Fourth Overall Beginner Showman — Neveah Powers, Fulton Co.Fifth Overall Beginner Showman — Sydney Sanders, Highland Co.Sixth Overall Beginner Showman — Madison Paden, Guernsey Co.Seventh Overall Beginner Showman — Blake Herdman, Highland Co.Eighth Overall Beginner Showman — Carly Sanders, Highland Co.Ninth Overall Beginner Showman — Ethan Davies, Wood Co.Tenth Overall Beginner Showman — Logan Schroeder, Defiance Co. JuniorChampion Junior Showman — Victoria Waits, Fayette Co.Reserve Champion Junior Showman — Chris Tooms, Muskingum Co.Third Overall Junior Showman — Harrison Blay, Portage Co.Fourth Overall Junior Showman — Mya Hetrick, Sandusky Co.Fifth Overall Junior Showman — Destiny Lafever, Ashland Co.Sixth Overall Junior Showman — Fulton Kennedy, Adams Co.Seventh Overall Junior Showman — Erin Pope, Gallia Co.Eighth Overall Junior Showman — Hunter Harris, Adams Co.Ninth Overall Junior Showman — Caden Jones, Allen Co.Tenth Overall Junior Showman — Kinzee Shafer, Preble Co. IntermediateChampion Intermediate Showman — Allison Davis, Carroll Co.Reserve Champion Intermediate Showman — Dalton Kennedy, Adams Co.Third Overall Intermediate Showman — Lori Millenbaugh, Crawford Co.Fourth Overall Intermediate Showman — Olivia Wood, Clinton Co.Fifth Overall Intermediate Showman —Jordan Johnson, Gallia Co.Sixth Overall Intermediate Showman — Kathy Lehman, Richland Co.Seventh Overall Intermediate Showman — Kyle Piscione, Medina Co.Eighth Overall Intermediate Showman — Cade Liggett, Tuscarawas Co.Ninth Overall Intermediate Showman — Emily Paden, Guernsey Co.Tenth Overall Intermediate Showman (tie) — Hannah Topmiller, Warren Co.Tenth Overall Intermediate Showman (tie) — Haley Frazier, Jackson Co. SeniorChampion Senior Showman — Taylor Morbitzer, Franklin Co.Reserve Champion Senior Showman (tie) — Kendra Gabriel, Pickaway Co.Reserve Champion Senior Showman (tie) — Jessica Millenbaugh, Crawford Co.Third Overall Senior Showman — Emma Mathews, Clinton Co.Fourth Overall Senior Showman — Mindy Barr, Pickaway Co.Fifth Overall Senior Showman — Austin Garner, Butler Co.Sixth Overall Senior Showman — Danielle Whitted, Portage Co.Seventh Overall Senior Showman — Bricen Hess, Highland Co.Eighth Overall Senior Showman — Brianna Ellish, Miami Co.Ninth Overall Senior Showman — Lindsey Pugh, Stark Co.Tenth Overall Senior Showman — Jacob Jones, Brown Co.last_img read more

Cyclone ‘Bulbul’ to make landfall between West Bengal and Bangladesh coasts

first_imgCyclone ‘Bulbul’, which has intensified into a very severe cyclonic storm, is likely to make landfall between West Bengal and Bangladesh in the early hours of Sunday, bringing in its wake heavy rain and gusts of up to 135 kmph in the coastal areas, the Met department said.The storm might cause damage to kutcha houses, power and communication lines and roads in parts of the state, Regional Met Director G.K. Das said, advising people in vulnerable areas to stay indoors.It might also uproot trees, ruin crops and cause embankment erosion, he warned.According to Mr. Das, Kolkata was expected to experience heavy to very heavy rainfall with gusts of up to 70 km per hour on November 9 and 10.The weatherman said the severe cyclonic storm, which lay centred 600 km south of Kolkata on Friday morning, was expected to intensify further by Saturday and move northwards.“Thereafter, it is very likely to re-curve northeastwards and make landfall between Sagar Islands of West Bengal and Khepupara in Bangladesh across Sunderban delta during the early hours of November 10,” Das said.During landfall, ‘Bulbul’ is “very likely” to be in the ‘severe cyclonic storm’ category with maximum sustained windspeed of 110 to 120 km per hour, gusting up to 135 kmph, the regional Met director said.The weatherman has asked the Bengal administration to suspend fishing activities and ferry boat service on November 9 and 10 in Kolkata, North and South 24 Parganas, Howrah, Hooghly, East and West Midnapore districts.It suggested that coastal hutment dwellers be moved to safer places.The Met department also asked tourists in seaside resort towns along the West Bengal coast not to indulge in any water-based activity from the evening of November 8.According to the IMD, light to moderate rain was likely at many places over the coastal districts of West Bengal on Friday, with heavy rain at one or two areas.The intensity of showers is very likely to increase on November 9 with heavy to very heavy rain at a few places and extremely heavy rain at one or two places in North and South 24 Parganas, East and West Midnapore, Kolkata, Howrah and Hooghly.The weatherman said that gale wind speed reaching 120 to 130 kmph and gusting to 140 kmph was prevailing over westcentral and adjoining eastcentral Bay of Bengal.“The windspeed is very likely to increase gradually to 145 to 155 kmph, with gusts of up to 170 kmph by early hours of November 9,”Mr. Das said.The coastal areas of the state were likely to be hit by 110 to 120 kmph gale wind, with gusts up to 135 kmph from November 9 afternoon, the IMD prediction said.34 NDRF teams in WB, OdishaThe NDRF has stationed a total of 34 teams in West Bengal and Odisha in view of the approaching severe cyclone Bulbul, a senior official said on Friday.Seventeen teams each have been stationed in the two states and the National Disaster Response Force is prepared to tackle any eventuality, NDRF Director General S N Pradhan said here.An NDRF team has about 45 personnel.Mr. Pradhan said out of the total teams in Odisha, six have been deployed while the rest are in reserve. Similarly in West Bengal, 10 teams of the counter-disaster force have been deployed while the rest are on standby.“All preparations have been done and our teams are in touch with the administrative authorities of both West Bengal and Odisha,” he said.The National Crisis Management Committee, headed by Cabinet Secretary Rajiv Gauba, on Friday took stock of the preparedness for rescue and relief operations for ‘Bulbul’, which is likely to hit Odisha and West Bengal.The IMD has said the cyclone, which had developed over Bay of Bengal, has now intensified and is likely to cross the West Bengal coast by early Sunday morning.Heavy-to-extremely heavy rainfall, accompanied by winds reaching up to 110-120kmph and tidal waves up to 1.5 metres, are expected.last_img read more

Ice cave carved from receding glacier collapses near Haines Junction Yukon

first_imgWHITEHORSE — A cave-like tunnel formed by a retreating glacier in Yukon has collapsed, months after hikers were warned to stay clear of the increasingly unstable formation.The ice cave near Kluane National Park, about 170 kilometres west of Whitehorse, has been a popular hiking destination for years but an expert with Yukon Geological Survey says a new photo confirms the tunnel is gone.Geologist Jeff Bond says only a remnant of one side of the arch remains.Hikers used to be able to walk beneath the huge, bluish formation but warnings were issued earlier this year about the tunnel’s stability when massive chunks of ice began to fall from the underside.Bond says the tunnel, which was formed by water flowing under the receding glacier, is “doing what it was supposed to do, which is melt, get thinner and collapse.”The tunnel spanned a creek bed about 13 kilometres outside Haines Junction and Bond estimates it was once part of an active glacier between 100 and 400 years old.“The tunnel has always been sort of active, even when the glacier was at that location,” says Bond.“It’s been around for, probably, a few hundred years. As we know it, that tunnel has likely been there for a few decades, for sure.”The glacier has since receded toward Mount Archibald and the Kluane icefields leading to Mount Logan, Canada’s highest peak.(CKRW)Tim Kucharuk, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

FORMER CEO OF LIME BEHIND NEW ACCOUNTING FIRM

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppTURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS, NOVEMBER 7, 2013- Just a few months since his resignation from LIME, Drexwell Seymour is now announcing the opening of a HLB TCI, located at Regent Village, Grace Bay on Providenciales. The new accounting company sees a merging of minds with Bahamian Philip Galanis of HLB Galanis & Co. The firm will provide a wide range of financial services including Accounting, Auditing, Business valuation and Consulting Services. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:last_img read more

Jokanovic urges fringe players to fight for places

first_imgFulham manager Slavisa Jokanovic is disappointed that some of his players are not putting in enough fight despite missing out on selection in his starting line-up.Fulham spent more than £100m during the summer signing 12 players, but have just one win from their opening 12 Premier League matches, and manager Jokanovic is likely to name the same starting eleven for two games in a row despite believing that competition for places is healthy.“This process is never finished, other players are going to have an opportunity to push hard and fight for the space in the team,” Jokanovic told Sky Sports.“I want to encourage my players to not wait for an opportunity. I want to encourage them to fight, to force the situation and show me they are my best choice. This is what I expect.Official: Tottenham sign Fulham youngster Ryan Sessegnon Andrew Smyth – August 8, 2019 Tottenham have sealed another transfer deadline day deal to sign the highly-rated Ryan Sessegnon from Fulham.“I want to make some competition between them and for them to be hurt when they are not in the starting XI. This is what I miss right now.“And we’re going to push harder and in this way be competitive in Premier League games too.”last_img read more