Whew, that’s done!

first_imgFor many, writing a senior thesis is the ultimate academic challenge of College life. About half of Harvard students undertake this weighty endeavor, which is required only for honors students at most Schools. On deadline day, their original research, writing, and tortured all-nighters are sometimes rewarded with interdepartmental parties featuring cake and champagne.More tributes follow the March filings — at least for a lucky few — in early May with the announcement of the Hoopes Prize, which recognizes outstanding undergraduate research. A few days later, the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) holds its annual Design & Project Fair, where dean’s awards are bestowed for outstanding engineering projects.Lyra Wanzer ’19, who built an electroadhesive treaded microrobot, was one of this year’s four winners. She was delighted. “I put so much work and time in this,” said Wanzer, a Vermont native who fell in love with robotics in high school. “So many hours for a whole year.”Students in the engineering bachelor’s program at SEAS are required to work on a capstone project, similar to a thesis, which aims to solve a real-world problem. Wanzer built a 6-centimeter-long microrobot with treads like a military tank. It can stick to conductive surfaces and could be used for search and rescue operations or inspecting pipes, engines, and other places where the human hand can’t reach.Across the University, the thesis is a rite of passage that students approach with mixed feelings. There is dread about the amount of work involved — each thesis must be between 10,000 and 20,000 words, 60 to 100 pages, and involve original research — but also a deep feeling of accomplishment once it’s finally done.Such was the case for David Shayne ’19, who is concentrating in social studies with a secondary in visual and environmental studies. Shayne handed in his thesis on the history of the American economic crises one hour before the deadline. He was tired after sleeping little in the previous 48 hours, but mostly overwhelmed by pride and joy.“I’m exhausted and stunned that the thesis exists and that I produced so many pages [about 100],” he said, looking a bit disheveled on the March 13 deadline. “I did my thesis by the sheer tyranny of will. It’s a weird and wonderful feeling.”,In most Schools a thesis is optional, but it is a requirement for students on the honors track. About half of all students across the College pursue honors within their concentrations; the numbers vary according to Schools and departments. Lauren Bimmler, undergraduate program administrator in the English Department, said 34 out of 48 seniors there are on the honors track.A lower percentage of SEAS students write senior theses. This year, 42 out of 140 computer science concentrators wrote one, as did 30 out of 100 students concentrating in applied mathematics.For Hyo-Won Jeon, who is concentrating in social studies, working on her thesis meant sacrifice. When she handed it in, she felt relieved.“Every day was truly a test,” said Jeon, who spent the night before the deadline at the library working on her paper on intercountry adoptees who don’t have U.S. citizenship. “The hardest part was not being able to spend time with my friends because I was working.”Students don’t undertake the challenge alone. The University offers tutorials, seminars, and workshops on how to choose a topic, do research, and write the thesis, and assigns advisers who guide students through the whole process. They may also apply for grants for research and travel.For seniors in the S.B. engineering program, SEAS requires the two-semester capstone course “Engineering Design Projects” (ES 100). This year’s projects showed a wide array of interests, from a 3D-printable implant to replace part of the ear’s canal wall to a wearable device that provides early detection of infection in pediatric patients to a portable gadget that measures atmospheric mercury levels.Seniors concentrating in applied mathematics also demonstrated a broad array of interests, said Sarah Iams, assistant director of undergraduate studies in applied mathematics.Hyo-Won Jeon (right) hands in her thesis to Nicole Dejong Newendorp. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer“It’s a cool, wide range of topics, from sports theses to economic questions to decoding Inca quipus,” said Iams.In the English Department, students can write critical or creative theses. Bimmler said creative theses, such as collections of poems or short stories, novellas, and screenplays, are on the rise. Two years ago, Obasi Shaw ’17 turned in “Liminal Minds,” the first rap album ever submitted at the English Department.This year, there were 13 creative theses and next year officials anticipate 23, said Bimmler.For many students the best part of tackling a thesis is that they can choose any topic, depending on their interests or fields of study. Among this year’s Hoopes Prize winners are works on female judges and crime in India, American country music in Italy, Nazis in America, gang violence in El Salvador, and the spread of the invasive strawberry guava in Madagascar’s rainforests.Schools have different deadlines for students to turn in their theses. In the Social Studies Department, it’s always the Wednesday before spring break to allow students enjoy the recess without any thesis-related concerns. At SEAS, it’s the last Friday of March.On deadline day, some Schools hold small parties with champagne, cake, and hors d’oeuvres to cheer on students as they arrive with the product of their labor. It’s a well-deserved celebration, said Anya Bernstein Bassett, senior lecturer and director of studies in social studies.“They take on an independent project and go through the ups and downs because there are always challenges,” said Bassett. “Your interview subjects won’t talk to you, you go to a field site and it’s not what you expected, and they have to manage through that. It says so much about who they are and how committed they are.”Senior lecturer Anya Bassett (from left) accepts theses from Layla Siddig, Rohan Shah, and Anwar Omeish. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff PhotographerJuliana Rodrigues ’19, who’s concentrating in social studies, shared the sentiment.“It’s a capstone for your educational experience at Harvard,” she said. “It’s a way to reflect back on everything you’ve learned in your time here and bring that all together that speaks to who you are and what you value.”Anna Antongiorgi ’19 is concentrating in English with a secondary in Theater, Dance & Media. Her creative thesis was both an intellectual and emotional enterprise. She wrote a collection of 120 poems inspired by her love of writing and dancing.In many ways, the paper didn’t feel like homework, said Antongiorgi, who began dancing at age 5 and started writing poems in high school. At times, it was cathartic, at times overwhelming, but mostly it was enjoyable. The process has led her to ponder new possibilities.“I’m still writing,” said Antongiorgi. “It felt like it was just the beginning. I don’t feel finished.”last_img read more

Living hydrogel can help heal intestinal wounds

first_img The IBD–gut bug connection Could open the door to new bioactive healing strategies In their new study, the team further built on these findings by introducing the machinery for producing one of the mucoadhesive hydrogels based on TFF3 into an E. coli Nissle strain that is a normal gut bacterium that can thrive in the colon and cecum sections of the intestinal tract affected by IBD, and is currently sold in many commercial probiotic formulations. “We found that the newly engineered Nissle bacteria, when given orally, also populated and resided in the intestinal tract, and that their curli fibers integrated with the intestinal mucus layer,” said first author Pichet Praveschotinunt, who is a graduate student mentored by Joshi.“When we induced colitis in the colons of mice by orally administering the chemical dextran sodium sulfate, animals that had received the PATCH-generating E. coli Nissle strain by daily rectal administration starting three days prior to chemical treatment had significantly faster healing and lower inflammatory responses, which caused them to lose much less weight and recover faster compared to control animals,” said Praveschotinunt. “Their colon epithelial mucosa displayed a more normal morphology and lower numbers of infiltrating immune cells.”Joshi and his team think that their approach could be developed as a companion therapy to existing anti-inflammatory, immuno-suppressant, and antibiotic therapies to help minimize patients’ exposure to the drugs and potentially provide protection against IBD relapses.Additional authors on the study are Wyss Institute researchers Ilia Gelfat, Franziska Bahl, and David B. Chou.The study was supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health, funds from Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Blavatnik Biomedical Accelerator, and a royal Thai government scholarship. New findings reveal how inflammatory bowel disease disrupts the microbiome The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.center_img Related About 1.6 million people in the U.S.  have an incurable inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) such as Crohn’s or ulcerative colitis, and 70,000 new cases are diagnosed each year.IBD patients suffer from pain, extreme discomfort, and numerous other symptoms caused by continuously relapsing and remitting inflammatory lesions in the layer of cells that lines the intestinal lumen (mucosa). The exact causes for IBD still are poorly understood, but it is clear that a misdirected immune system is at work, and that certain components of the microbial community in our gut, known as the intestinal microbiome, and environmental factors contribute to its destructive forces.While anti-inflammatory drugs can dampen acute inflammation and antibiotics can fight local infections when IBD episodes flare up, their use also comes at a cost. Anti-inflammatory drugs can have severe side effects, and antibiotics can disrupt the beneficial parts of the microbiome. Importantly, there are no wound treatments available that could be applied to inflamed lesions directly from inside the gut lumen in order to speed up healing and minimize use of those drugs.Now, a research team at Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering led by Neel Joshi has developed a living-material approach that uses a strain of genetically engineered E.coli Nissle gut bacteria as a locally acting probiotic. The engineered bacteria produce a network of nanofibers that directly binds to mucus to fill inflamed areas like a patch, shielding them from gut microbes and environmental factors. This probiotic-based therapeutic strategy protected mice against the effects of colitis induced by a chemical agent and promoted mucosal healing. Their findings are reported in Nature Communications.“With this ‘living therapeutics’ approach, we created multivalent biomaterials that are secreted by resident engineered bacteria on-site and attach to many mucus proteins at a time — firmly adhering to the viscous and otherwise moving mucus layer, which is a challenging thing to do,” said Joshi. “The Probiotic Associated Therapeutic Curli Hybrids (PATCH) approach, as we named it, creates a biocompatible, mucoadhesive coating that functions as a stable, self-regenerating Band-Aid and provides biological cues for mucosal healing.”,Joshi presently is a core faculty member of the Wyss Institute and associate professor at Harvard’s Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), and will shortly be appointed as a professor at Northeastern University in Boston.In previous work, Joshi’s group demonstrated that self-regenerating bacterial hydrogels firmly attached to mucosal surfaces ex vivo, and, when orally given to mice, withstood the harsh pH and digestive conditions of the stomach and small intestine without affecting the animals’ health. To fabricate them, his team programmed a laboratory E. coli strain to synthesize and secrete a modified CsgA protein, which as part of E. coli’s “curli” system assembles into long nanofibers at the outer surface of the bacteria. “To enable mucus adhesion, we fused CsgA to the mucus-binding domain of different human trefoil factors (TFFs), proteins that occur naturally in the intestinal mucosa and bind to mucins, the major mucus proteins present there. The secreted fusion proteins form a water-storing mesh with tunable hydrogel properties,” said co-author Anna Duraj-Thatte, a postdoctoral fellow working with Joshi. “This turned out to be a simple and robust strategy to produce self-renewing, mucoadhesive materials with long residence times in the mouse intestinal tract.” Probiotic hydrogels heal gut wounds that other treatments can’t reachlast_img read more

Three Major Health IT Moves Taking Shape in 2017

first_imgIt’s National Health IT Week and we at Dell EMC are taking this time to look at the healthcare IT (HIT) trends of 2017. As always, evolving technology and innovation continues to drive healthcare transformation, but there are a few have become established movements in changing the healthcare landscape over this past year.1. Data: From Acquisition To “Appification”The data lifecycle—taking raw data to innovation—is speeding up, bringing us closer to the promise of evidence-based medicine.With increasing adoption of cloud in 2017, especially software-defined, secure cloud technologies, providers are gaining the convenience and accessibility needed to pool large data sets (both clinical and non-clinical) and apply analytics functionality like never before.Recent developments made in the areas of cognitive computing, machine learning and AI are helping to translate the massive volume of raw data into meaningful insights—insights that are leading to ground-breaking point-of-care and patient solutions. Take Freenome, for example, a San Francisco-based startup that is using AI to build non-invasive disease screenings. And on the patient-end of things we have solutions like the AI-powered mobile app, YourMD, that is turning your data into “trusted and actionable information”.As data becomes more a part of the fabric of our healthcare ecosystem, it is critical that we continue to leverage the latest advancements, following four basic steps in the process of turning data into innovations: acquire everything, analyze anything, archive the right things, and amplify/appify actionable things.Figure 1. The data cycle includes four basic steps that help turn raw data into timely, meaningful and actionable intelligence, and then into clinically-relevant applications and solutions2. Consumerism: Empowered Patients and New Care ChoicesWe’ve witnessed several trends over the past year to support the rise in healthcare consumerism. First is the growing consolidation of providers—a model that has taken shape largely because of a need to form clinically integrated networks that streamline care, reduce costs and provide more patient-centric services. Just this year we witnessed consolidations from healthcare giants, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), both acquiring a network of regional health systems in their respective states. It’s a move that they anticipate will help reduce costs and improve care for millions of patients.Secondly, competition is growing. Retail health veterans like CVS and Walgreens, along with major telehealth service providers like TeleDoc, are leading the way in providing a user-driven telehealth and mobile app experience. With that comes more convenience and choice, and a growing expectation from patients for similar user experiences across the healthcare industry.Thirdly, innovation and appification empower patients, especially millennials, to take the lead in sharing their health information. Mobile apps and tracking devices offer new methods for acquiring data, while patient portals and IM’ing options help with data sharing between patients and their providers, family members and even payers. Many patients are even sharing data generated from consumer devices such as Fitbits (even though much of that data remains non-clinical). There is also a willingness from patients to share their data with employers and payers to help lower insurance rates.These influences are expediting the adoption of healthcare consumerism in 2017.3. Patient Safety: Beyond Ransomware to Life-And-Death Scenarios2017 continues to bear witness to a significant rise in breaches and ransomware attacks aimed at the healthcare industry. Not simply just a security issue, patient safety is now a top concern, especially as attacks target medical devices and critical care systems.The ‘Wannacry’ ransomware attack for instance took down major health systems, preventing access to patient information and suspending procedures. It garnered the attention of board level executives, causing many to rethink how they handle security, especially when it comes to protecting patients in their care.And if that weren’t enough, a new threat is emerging—the malicious creation of synthetic data. Imagine a pace maker that has been hacked, and false signals sent to it causing it to malfunction. The possibility of data manipulation poses serious health concerns and is causing hospital CISOs to pay close attention.Staying ahead of these threats is no small feat, especially since data has officially left the building. No longer just about defending the perimeter, the key to threat detection and response is an automated, holistic and analytics-driven security approach, one that extends laterally and vertically across the healthcare ecosystem.As we head into the final months of the year, it’s clear that management of the data cycle, rising consumerism and the need to protect patients from cyberattacks will define and shape our HIT priorities. The rapid proliferation of all-things digital, with its promises and vulnerabilities, will drive innovation and force IT executives to embrace change.last_img read more

Court upholds Feb. 14 date for disputed Catalan election

first_imgMADRID (AP) — A court in Catalonia has confirmed that an upcoming vote to choose the northeastern Spanish region’s new parliament and replace the government will take place in two weeks as scheduled. Catalonia’s High Court on Friday overturned an order with which the regional government, citing a high prevalence of coronavirus contagion, had wanted to push the election to the end of May. Campaigning officially began Friday with parties holding odd events surrounded by very few supporters live-streamed on social media. Eight politicians and activists imprisoned after a failed 2017 push for Catalan independence will be allowed to take part in campaigning but will need to return to prison each day.last_img read more

Oregon 1st state to decriminalize possession of drugs

first_imgSALEM, Ore. (AP) — Police in Oregon can no longer arrest someone for possession of small amounts of heroin, methamphetamine and other drugs. A ballot measure that decriminalized them took effect on Monday. Instead, those found in possession would face a $100 fine or a health assessment. Backers of the ballot measure, which Oregon voters passed by a wide margin in November, hailed it as a revolutionary move for the United States. Ballot Measure 110’s backers said treatment needs to be the priority and that criminalizing drug possession was not working. Oregon is a pioneer in liberalizing drug laws. It was the first state, in 1973, to decriminalize marijuana possession.last_img read more

Turkey rejects criticism of its handling of student protest

first_imgANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkey has rejected international criticism of its crackdown on protests by students opposing the appointment of a government loyalist to head Istanbul’s top university. The Turkish Foreign Ministry on Thursday warned countries to stay out of its domestic issues. Students and faculty members of Bogazici University have been protesting President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s appointment as rector of an academic who once ran for parliament as a candidate for the ruling party, and have been calling for his resignation. Some of the protests have erupted into clashes between police and demonstrators and hundreds of people have been detained.last_img read more

MBA competition begins

first_imgNotre Dame’s Master’s in Business Administration (MBA) program is providing prospective MBA students with an opportunity to showcase their business acumen through the third-annual Mini Deep-Dive Challenge, a competition asking students to solve a real-life corporate responsibility.According to a University press release, the grand prizewinner will receive a $25,000 fellowship if admitted to the Notre Dame MBA program, and the first 50 students to sign up will receive a $50 prize package. Bill Brennan, MBA initiatives program director, said the challenge is based on interterm intensive sessions in which MBA students participate twice a year. “What we do in those is in a four day period of time, we work with what I refer to as ‘big, sexy companies’ like GE, IBM [and] HP … [and] students tackle live business problems that the companies have yet to resolve,” Brennan said. This year’s partner for the Mini Deep-Dive Challenge is Sprint, who will post a business problem concerning corporate responsibility online, and students will have to draft a one-page explanation of their solution, Brennan said. “The real challenge to a lot of people is … creating a solution that’s refined to the point that it’s easily articulated and that it makes a lot of sense business-wise,” he said. “You’re looking at something that’s seemingly very complex, but your solution has to evolve in the rationality you use to the point where you have to explain it in one page.” Faculty at the Mendoza College of Business will choose the best proposals to send to Sprint executives, who will then determine the grand prizewinner and the top 10 finishers, Brennan said. “Understanding the problem or the opportunity, coming up with a viable solution – those would be heavily weighted elements of the judging process,” he said. Besides testing students’ business skills, Brennan said one goal of the competition is to give prospective MBA students an idea of what the Notre Dame program is like, which influenced the program’s decision to make corporate responsibility the challenge’s theme. “‘Ask more of business’ is our slogan here in the Mendoza College of Business, and we really believe strongly that corporate social responsibility is an important part of business,” he said. “Doing well is doing good, and it leads to good results not only for society but for the bottom line of the business … We think [this focus is] one of those things that makes Notre Dame a little bit unique, that we’re willing to show our values.” In addition to promoting the MBA program, Brennan said the competition is also an extension of the work the Mendoza College of Business does to raise awareness about corporate responsibility. “This is also a continuation of who we are. Fr. Sorin wrote that letter years ago about being a force for good in society, and this is one of the many little ways that we hope to do that as well, by providing exposure to people on corporate social responsibility,” he said. “Even something like this Mini Deep-Dive Challenge is … hopefully making for better citizenry, society and businesspeople all in one.”last_img read more

Professional athlete discusses humanitarianism

first_imgRuth Riley, a 2001 Notre Dame graduate and former Notre Dame women’s basketball player, came to the Eck Center last night to give the lecture “From Professional Athlete to Humanitarian: How I Became involved in the Fight Against Poverty and Disease,” an event organized by the Ford Family Program in Human Development Studies and Solidarity.         “It’s up to us as individuals how much we want to be engaged,” Riley said. “I learned very quickly that I wanted to utilize the platform I have [as an athlete] to make a difference.“People ask me what makes me different than most professional athletes — why do I spend time doing what I do? I would say it’s simply how I prioritize my time.”Riley said seeing the lives of those living in malaria-stricken countries left her overwhelmed after her time as a spokeswoman for Nothing but Nets, a charity dedicated to preventing the spread of malaria.“I’m in a clinic and there’s a mother there who is holding a child who is dying of malaria,” said Riley. “She told me she already lost one of her children.“For me, I’ve never been a mother. I didn’t know what it felt like, and I felt so inadequate in that moment to help her.”On a trip to Nairobi as a spokeswoman for a Global Business Coalition for tuberculosis, AIDS and malaria, Riley said her experiences opened her up to the terrible social impact of disease.“Nothing can prepare you for the reality of what life is like in the slums of Nairobi,” she said. “I got a crash course in the feminization of AIDS.“Women were being raped by a rate of 50 percent or more, largely by the rumor that raping a virgin [would cure AIDS], so women were being raped at a very young age. Women had no rights.”   There is a disconnect — a “spoil factor” — between those who are able to help and those who need aid keeping progress from going as quickly as possible, Riley said.          “A lot of professional athletes surround themselves with people that aren’t directed on the path of giving back to others,” she said. “We have things like health care and talk about things like movies.“Mothers [in these countries], they don’t expect their kids to live beyond the age of five. The leadership in a lot of these countries is so corrupt, and information and knowledge is power and they don’t even have access to that.”Even with the multitude of obstacles and countless variables in these countries that require consideration, Riley said maintaining optimism is vital to maintaining progress.“There are so many factors like corruption and ignorance that keep the cycle of crime and poverty in place,” said Riley. “It’s easy to be overwhelmed by all the obstacles and the contributing factors when you’re working with HIV…so it’s really necessary to focus and celebrate the small steps you make on the way.”Tags: Athlete, Eck Center, Humanitarianlast_img read more

SMC Love Your Body Week promotes self-image and healthy living

first_imgKeri O’Mara Saint Mary’s 5th annual Love Your Body Week (LYBW) takes place this week, with the goal of addressing all of the struggles students may have with their bodies in hopes to transform negative perceptions into positive self-images.Love Your Body Week event co-chair and senior Chloe Deranek explained how the main goal of the week’s events is to show support for achieving positive body images for all students in the best way possible.“The mission of the week is to help the Saint Mary’s community come together in a way that supports and loves positive body image through healthy eating and exercise,” Deranek said.According to Deranek, the main goal of the week is essential, but can also be expanded to include an emphasis on the importance of taking care of one’s self.“This includes treating yourself, because lots of things go into being a healthy person,” Deranek said. “The overall goal is to help girls love themselves for who they are.”The week kicked off Sunday evening with a mass in Le Mans Chapel, followed by a “Hairspray” movie-watch in Vander Vennet Theater in the Student Center with sundaes, Kaitlyn Tarullo, event co-chair and senior, said.On Monday, a student panel in which women shared their personal stories of eating disorders was designed to show students that they are not alone in the struggle with body image.“It puts a face to someone who may be struggling in silence to say, ‘Someone’s been there and this is how they’ve gotten help,’” Deranek said. “A lot of times, especially with eating disorders, it’s hard to acknowledge a problem, and you feel on your own, so a student panel is a very good way to show people they are not alone.”LYBW will continue on Tuesday with an event titled, “A Mother/Daughter Journey on ‘The Biggest Loser,’” featuring a former mother and daughter team on the popular weight-loss show.Marci and Courtney Crozier of Valapraiso, Indiana, will share their stories of each losing nearly 100 pounds on the program and how they have maintained healthy lifestyles that continue to inspire thousands of followers on social media since the airing of the show, Tarullo said.“[It’s] really exciting because sometimes obesity gets overlooked during Love Your Body Week and really the week is about being healthy as a whole, not just eating disorders,” Tarullo said. “We want to remind girls that it includes loving yourself overall, and we think that having the Croziers here to share their story will be a great addition to the week.”On Thursday, the popular event ‘Yoga and Yogurt’ will be held in Angela Athletic Center at 7:30 p.m., but Deranek said that they’ve added a slight twist this year.“We are continuing the tradition, but we are putting a little spin on it with a Throwback Thursday and 90s theme,” Deranek said.Love Your Body Week will conclude Friday with a “Treat Yo’ Self” event from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the second floor of the Student Center. There, students will have the opportunity to be pampered by local boutiques, salons and a bakery serving gourmet cupcakes, Tarullo said.Tarullo explained this year’s mission differs from previous years by addressing all of the ways positive body image can be affected in order to relate to a broader audience.“I think the emphasis used to be on a lot of eating disorders,” Tarullo said. “Getting this position this year, Chloe and I made it our goal to make it more well-rounded and include everybody who is fighting this battle.”Deranek added, “We are just trying to broaden what Love Your Body Week encompasses.” Tags: Body Image, Chloe Deranek, Crozier, Kaitlyn Tarullo, Love Your Body Week, LYBW, Marci and Courtney Crozier, self-image, The Biggest Loser, Yoga and Yogurtlast_img read more

Mary Galvin replaces Crawford as COS dean

first_imgIn the third grade, Dr. Mary Galvin said, she was told that she was not college material; last month, she succeeded Dr. Gregory Crawford as the William K. Warren Foundation Dean of the College of Science.A chemistry major who spent her undergraduate career at Manhattanville College in Purchase, New York, Galvin said she tried graduate school for chemistry but left and decided to study polymers and materials science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Though her interest in science began in high school, she said MIT cultivated her love for the subject, specifically for materials.“It was … at MIT that I realized science was very interdisciplinary,” Galvin said. “It involved communicating with people, going to meetings. … I liked that aspect of science that people are unaware of. You really meet people from across the globe, and science unites you.”Galvin said her favorite aspect of science is that it is open to everyone.“I grew up very poor, one of seven children. My father had not finished ninth grade, but they wanted all of us to go to college, and we did,” Galvin said. “And science is an area that you can come from any background, and if you work hard and have talent, you can go really far in science. … There is a meritocracy in science that to me is very attractive.”Galvin took at job at Bell Laboratories after MIT and stayed there for 14 years, she said. From there, she spent eight years developing a materials science department at the University of Delaware. She has also worked for Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., and the National Science Fund.Galvin started the next phase of her career Aug. 17, as Dean of the College of Science at Notre Dame.“This a special place,” Galvin said. “I was impressed with the University’s commitment to science and to engineering and to research and how that can enhance undergraduate education, how it can make a difference in solving many of the problems we face in society from health to energy to sustainability.”Galvin said she believes she is a good fit for the dean position because she has dealt with different disciplines that fall under the College and that she hopes she can use the position to have a positive effect on students and faculty.“Really what I want to do is work with the faculty, who are very talented, to allow them to reach the dreams that they and the administration have set for being a really top research university,” she said.Tags: College of Science, galvin, mary galvinlast_img read more